Malinda Lo

Malinda Lo

I am the author of several YA novels including the duology Adaptation and Inheritance (out now!). I'm also co-founder with Cindy Pon of Diversity in YA.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

xxxshakespearexxx:

This is super cool.

Love demands expression. It will not stay still, stay silent, be good, be modest, be seen and not heard, no. It will break out in tongues of praise, the high note that smashes the glass and spills the liquid. It is no conservationist love. It is a big game hunter and you are the game.
- Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body
somuchflotsam:

For those who have been so lovely to inquire: I am hard at work on another YA novel. Before I was just at work. But now it’s hard at work, I promise. It’s contemp and very celesborific. One of its two narrators is a wunderkind writer named Sylvan. In the image above you can read her expressing concerns that align pretty well with my own in regard to saying very much about WIPs. Though, of course, Sylvan’s take is rather more sharp-tongued than mine.
My reluctance to talk about what I’m working on, even when I’m nearing completion, probably has something to do with several superstitions that I’m too lazy to properly examine. But I do appreciate the interest from folks who have been interested. I hope you’ll stay tuned for awhile longer.

Yay! The above comes from emily m. danforth, author of The Miseducation of Cameron Post. I too have many superstitions about talking about works in progress, so I will say nothing more except GOOD LUCK!

somuchflotsam:

For those who have been so lovely to inquire: I am hard at work on another YA novel. Before I was just at work. But now it’s hard at work, I promise. It’s contemp and very celesborific. One of its two narrators is a wunderkind writer named Sylvan. In the image above you can read her expressing concerns that align pretty well with my own in regard to saying very much about WIPs. Though, of course, Sylvan’s take is rather more sharp-tongued than mine.

My reluctance to talk about what I’m working on, even when I’m nearing completion, probably has something to do with several superstitions that I’m too lazy to properly examine. But I do appreciate the interest from folks who have been interested. I hope you’ll stay tuned for awhile longer.

Yay! The above comes from emily m. danforth, author of The Miseducation of Cameron Post. I too have many superstitions about talking about works in progress, so I will say nothing more except GOOD LUCK!

wellesleymag:

Wellesley students cheer Boston Marathon runners outside Cazenove Hall in April 1983.

When I was at Wellesley I lived in the Quad all four years, and every year I remember going out to the road behind Pomeroy and Cazenove to cheer on the Boston Marathon runners. It always made me feel part of the greater Boston community, and I’m thinking of them today.

wellesleymag:

Wellesley students cheer Boston Marathon runners outside Cazenove Hall in April 1983.

When I was at Wellesley I lived in the Quad all four years, and every year I remember going out to the road behind Pomeroy and Cazenove to cheer on the Boston Marathon runners. It always made me feel part of the greater Boston community, and I’m thinking of them today.

sharpegirl:

Far From You by Tess Sharpe Giveaway!
Hey y’all, I’m giving away two signed copies of FAR FROM YOU (with a few extras thrown in!). One copy will have my notes and thoughts about the book scribbled in the margins, and the second copy will contain a handwritten short story about what happens to the characters after FAR FROM YOU ends.
To enter, all you have to do is reblog this post, or tweet a link to the giveaway with the hashtag #farfromyou. This is an international Giveaway and it ends on Monday, April 21st and the winners will be announced on the 22nd! 

I’m not entering this giveaway because I already have a copy, but I’m reblogging to signal boost it. This book was awesome, folks! A mystery  with a bisexual MC set in Northern California — go get it.

sharpegirl:

Far From You by Tess Sharpe Giveaway!

Hey y’all, I’m giving away two signed copies of FAR FROM YOU (with a few extras thrown in!). One copy will have my notes and thoughts about the book scribbled in the margins, and the second copy will contain a handwritten short story about what happens to the characters after FAR FROM YOU ends.

To enter, all you have to do is reblog this post, or tweet a link to the giveaway with the hashtag #farfromyou. This is an international Giveaway and it ends on Monday, April 21st and the winners will be announced on the 22nd! 

I’m not entering this giveaway because I already have a copy, but I’m reblogging to signal boost it. This book was awesome, folks! A mystery  with a bisexual MC set in Northern California — go get it.

Want More Diversity in Your YA? Here’s How You Can Help

diversityinya:

Within the last few weeks, the  New York TimesEntertainment Weekly, and CNN have all published articles examining the lack of diversity in children’s and young adult literature — and next month, School Library Journal plans to publish an entire issue devoted to diversity. While all this mainstream interest in diversity is to be applauded for bringing more people into the ongoing conversation about diversity, they still largely fail to tackle the problem of how we can change the status quo.

We at Diversity in YA obviously don’t have all the answers, and we aren’t the first people to talk about these issues. This conversation has been going on for decades. What we do have are ideas for how you can change the status quo right now. If you’re an ordinary reader, you don’t have to wait to show your support for books that show the world as it is. Here are five ways you can help make positive change right now:

1. Look for diversity. 

Make a conscious effort to seek out books to read that feature characters of color, LGBT characters, and/or disabled characters. They may not be front-and-center at your local Barnes & Noble; you may have to look around a bit or go online to find them.

2. Support diversity.

Support the diverse books that are published today by buying them, by checking them out at your library, or by requesting that your library buy them.

3. Recommend diversity.

If you use Goodreads, Facebook, social media, or have a blog, talk up the books you love that happen to have diverse characters. Tell your friends! Word of mouth is still key in bringing awareness to books. And remember: You don’t need to recommend them solely for their diversity — they’re great books to enjoy, plain and simple.

4. Talk up diversity.

When discussions around diversity in literature occur online, join in the conversation if you can to express that you do want more diverse books to read and that the issue is important to you.

5. Don’t give up.

There will always be people who dismiss “diversity” as meaningless. They are the reason we must keep fighting for representation. We’re all in this together.

* * *

Want a list of diverse YA books you can get started reading right now? Here are a dozen YA books of all kinds (contemporary, fantasy, sci-fi, mystery — something for everyone!) that happen to have characters of color, LGBT characters, and/or disabled characters.

Want even more book lists? Here’s a link to all of our book lists.