MALINDA LO

MALINDA LO

I am the author of several YA novels including the duology Adaptation and Inheritance (out now!). I'm also co-founder with Cindy Pon of Diversity in YA.
(via Autostraddle)

(via Autostraddle)

Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”
-

The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

Phelps tells this story herself in the excellent 1984 documentary Before Stonewall, which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube (she’s at 19:30, but really, watch the whole thing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX7AxQd82H8

(via theodoradove)

This makes me laugh every time I see it.

(via tamorapierce)

yari-vixx asked:
Hi! I love your books! You've totally inspired me to do something with the lesbian fantasy stories I've been writing for years. My issue is finding people to read my stories. I'm afraid of getting my ideas stolen through online groups. My friends are not interested. I've looked up editors but they don't read for content. I guess I just don't know where to start. Do you have any advice?

Thank you for the kind words!

The internet can feel like a cesspool of thieves and villains but I think it also can be a place to make real connections with real people. I’d suggest that you find an online writing forum that you really feel comfortable with (I know writers who have made great connections via the Absolute Write forums but there must be plenty of others — if anybody has suggestions please suggest them!), and hang out there for awhile (if you haven’t already). There will probably be people you get to know and trust in the online forum, and maybe you can form a little critique group? If all of you are trading your stories around for constructive criticism, then all of you will be accountable to each other, which lessens the possibilities for evil (I hope).

You can also look offline in your local community for writing workshops or writers’ groups. Check out your local community college or bookstore and see if they offer any leads to offline in-person writers groups. You might even enroll in a local writing workshop, and you can potentially meet people there. Again, if all of you are critiquing each other’s work, that means you’re all accountable.

Good luck with your writing!

As I said last night on twitter: To everyone who thinks it’s bizarre or shocking or scary to write lesbians into fantasy novels: do it anyway. It is awesome is what it is.
To clarify because this is tumblr and now I have more than 140 characters, what I mean is every so often I see someone blogging or tumblring or tweeting about how difficult they find the concept of writing about lesbians is, especially in speculative fiction. And by difficult I mean they really want to — maybe they’re lesbians themselves — but they’ve been conditioned by the mainstream to believe that (1) lesbians don’t exist in fantasy so if you put them in there it will be “bizarre”; (2) putting lesbians in fantasy will shock mainstream readers and thus the story/novel won’t sell so it’s not worth the time to write it*; (3) writing lesbians is scary because there are so few of them in SFF what if you get it wrong/it’s frightening to write something you desperately want to see/myriad other writerly fears based on marginalization.
So that explanation went on longer than I anticipated. There are lots of fears. They can stop you. But I hope you’ll push through them to the other side, which is full of awesome lesbians in fantasy! (And every other genre, I might add.)
* This was my biggest fear before I wrote Ash.

As I said last night on twitter: To everyone who thinks it’s bizarre or shocking or scary to write lesbians into fantasy novels: do it anyway. It is awesome is what it is.

To clarify because this is tumblr and now I have more than 140 characters, what I mean is every so often I see someone blogging or tumblring or tweeting about how difficult they find the concept of writing about lesbians is, especially in speculative fiction. And by difficult I mean they really want to — maybe they’re lesbians themselves — but they’ve been conditioned by the mainstream to believe that (1) lesbians don’t exist in fantasy so if you put them in there it will be “bizarre”; (2) putting lesbians in fantasy will shock mainstream readers and thus the story/novel won’t sell so it’s not worth the time to write it*; (3) writing lesbians is scary because there are so few of them in SFF what if you get it wrong/it’s frightening to write something you desperately want to see/myriad other writerly fears based on marginalization.

So that explanation went on longer than I anticipated. There are lots of fears. They can stop you. But I hope you’ll push through them to the other side, which is full of awesome lesbians in fantasy! (And every other genre, I might add.)

* This was my biggest fear before I wrote Ash.

distant-traveller:

Giants at work

This panoramic view of ESO’s flagship facility in northern Chile was taken by ESO Photo Ambassador Gabriel Brammer. The Very Large Telescope (VLT) is seen setting to work at ESO’s Paranal Observatory, visible against a backdrop of clear skies with the Milky Way overhead.
To create this picture, Brammer combined several long-exposure shots in order to capture the faint light of the Milky Way as it circled above the massive enclosures of the VLT’s Unit Telescopes. Each of these giants is 25 metres tall, and they are named after prominent features of the sky in the language of the local Mapuche tribe: the Sun, the Moon, the constellation of the Southern Cross, and Venus — Antu, Kueyen, Melipal, and Yepun respectively. On the left of the frame, the smaller Auxiliary Telescopes can be seen in their white round, domes, with the large and small Magellanic Clouds above them.
The combination of several shots reveals the movement of the telescope enclosures, each accompanied by a ghostly echo of themselves as they move during the night following their targets in the sky. The passage of time is also evident, with a bright evening sky giving way to a dark, star-speckled view towards the left of the image.

Image credit: ESO/G. Brammer

After a week at Launch Pad, I’m now super into telescopes!

distant-traveller:

Giants at work

This panoramic view of ESO’s flagship facility in northern Chile was taken by ESO Photo Ambassador Gabriel Brammer. The Very Large Telescope (VLT) is seen setting to work at ESO’s Paranal Observatory, visible against a backdrop of clear skies with the Milky Way overhead.

To create this picture, Brammer combined several long-exposure shots in order to capture the faint light of the Milky Way as it circled above the massive enclosures of the VLT’s Unit Telescopes. Each of these giants is 25 metres tall, and they are named after prominent features of the sky in the language of the local Mapuche tribe: the Sun, the Moon, the constellation of the Southern Cross, and Venus — Antu, Kueyen, Melipal, and Yepun respectively. On the left of the frame, the smaller Auxiliary Telescopes can be seen in their white round, domes, with the large and small Magellanic Clouds above them.

The combination of several shots reveals the movement of the telescope enclosures, each accompanied by a ghostly echo of themselves as they move during the night following their targets in the sky. The passage of time is also evident, with a bright evening sky giving way to a dark, star-speckled view towards the left of the image.

Image credit: ESO/G. Brammer

After a week at Launch Pad, I’m now super into telescopes!

Last night at #launchpadastro we visited WIRO, the Wyoming Infrared observatory, high up on the mountain. It was amazing to see so many stars!

Last night at #launchpadastro we visited WIRO, the Wyoming Infrared observatory, high up on the mountain. It was amazing to see so many stars!

ohstarstuff:

Galactic Center of Our Milky Way

The Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory — collaborated to produce an unprecedented image of the central region of our Milky Way galaxy.

Observations using infrared light and X-ray light see through the obscuring dust and reveal the intense activity near the galactic core. The center of the galaxy is located within the bright white region in the upper portion of the image. The entire image covers about one-half a degree, about the same angular width as the full moon.

Each telescope’s contribution is presented in a different color:

  • Yellow represents the near-infrared observations of Hubble. They outline the energetic regions where stars are being born as well as reveal hundreds of thousands of stars.
  • Red represents the infrared observations of Spitzer. The radiation and winds from stars create glowing dust clouds that exhibit complex structures from compact, spherical globules to long, stringy filaments.
  • Blue and violet represents the X-ray observations of Chandra. X-rays are emitted by gas heated to millions of degrees by stellar explosions and by outflows from the supermassive black hole in the galaxy’s center. The bright blue blob toward the bottom of the full field image is emission from a double star system containing either a neutron star or a black hole.

We just learned about how these sorts of images are made today at #launchpadastro. I can actually understand the explanations above now! How cool.

Another unforgettable #launchpadastro moment in which  I stick my head in a dinosaur skull because obviously.

Another unforgettable #launchpadastro moment in which I stick my head in a dinosaur skull because obviously.

Last night at #LaunchPadAstro I posed with this telescope! Cloudy skies so we didn’t see stars but there’s hope for later this week.

Last night at #LaunchPadAstro I posed with this telescope! Cloudy skies so we didn’t see stars but there’s hope for later this week.