Malinda Lo

Malinda Lo

I am the author of several YA novels including the duology Adaptation and Inheritance (out now!). I'm also co-founder with Cindy Pon of Diversity in YA.

matociquala:

What purse? SUCH PURSE.

Wow this is the dykiest fanny pack I’ve ever seen! I mean that as a compliment.

sarahreesbrennan:

onefourkidlit:

A starred Kirkus review for OneFour Kidlit author Corinne Duyvis!
“Duyvis smoothly transitions between the two main characters’ thoughts and emotions while realistically conveying the individual alienation and terror of two very different people. Rich worldbuilding, convincing nonheteronormative relationships, balanced class issues, and nuanced, ethnically diverse characters add to the novel’s depth. The well-paced action builds toward an unexpected, thrilling conclusion that will leave readers eager for more from this promising new author. Original and compelling; a stunning debut.” (via OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis | Kirkus)

I’m specially looking forward to this one.

Yay Corinne!

sarahreesbrennan:

onefourkidlit:

A starred Kirkus review for OneFour Kidlit author Corinne Duyvis!

“Duyvis smoothly transitions between the two main characters’ thoughts and emotions while realistically conveying the individual alienation and terror of two very different people. Rich worldbuilding, convincing nonheteronormative relationships, balanced class issues, and nuanced, ethnically diverse characters add to the novel’s depth. The well-paced action builds toward an unexpected, thrilling conclusion that will leave readers eager for more from this promising new author. Original and compelling; a stunning debut.”

(via OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis | Kirkus)

I’m specially looking forward to this one.

Yay Corinne!

diversityinya:

Diversity in 2013 New York Times Young Adult Bestsellers

Over the past year or so, I’ve examined diversity in the Publishers Weekly bestsellers (here’s 2012 and here’s 2013) as well as the Best Fiction for Young Adults (here’s 2013, here’s 2014). One list I haven’t looked at until now is the New York Times bestseller lists for young adult books.

My conclusions? There’s nothing really surprising about the diversity on the New York Times bestseller lists for young adult books. They tell the same story that Publishers Weekly does, but with a slightly different sample: There isn’t much diversity.

[Continue Reading]

Here’s my latest number crunching on diversity. I reread the post this morning and realized that I sound rather dour, but I guess that’s the result of repeated diversity counts that show diversity hovering around 15%. I suppose 15% isn’t as terrible as it could be, but it’s disheartening because some of the books in that 15% are really problematic when it comes to representation. And there are no black or Latino main characters, unless you count Every Day by David Levithan as all races.

The percentage of books with LGBT main characters is closer to what people believe is the percentage of LGBT people in the US, but it still depresses me because among the YA bestsellers (single title list), only one title (Battle Magic by Tamora Pierce) has a queer girl in it, and she’s one of three POV characters (from what I can tell from my research; I haven’t read the book). Among the series, there are no books with a lesbian main character, although Pretty Little Liars continues to represent with its bisexual character Emily, which may or may not be a positive thing depending on whether you think of her as Emily from the book series, or Emily from the TV series.

Anyway. I don’t think I’m going to be doing much of this counting anymore. It doesn’t show much beyond the fact that bestsellers are predominantly white and straight, which we all knew. I’m trying to see it as motivation to keep writing, as opposed to depressing statistics about how what I’m writing is hard to sell to the masses.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

xxxshakespearexxx:

This is super cool.

Love demands expression. It will not stay still, stay silent, be good, be modest, be seen and not heard, no. It will break out in tongues of praise, the high note that smashes the glass and spills the liquid. It is no conservationist love. It is a big game hunter and you are the game.
- Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body
somuchflotsam:

For those who have been so lovely to inquire: I am hard at work on another YA novel. Before I was just at work. But now it’s hard at work, I promise. It’s contemp and very celesborific. One of its two narrators is a wunderkind writer named Sylvan. In the image above you can read her expressing concerns that align pretty well with my own in regard to saying very much about WIPs. Though, of course, Sylvan’s take is rather more sharp-tongued than mine.
My reluctance to talk about what I’m working on, even when I’m nearing completion, probably has something to do with several superstitions that I’m too lazy to properly examine. But I do appreciate the interest from folks who have been interested. I hope you’ll stay tuned for awhile longer.

Yay! The above comes from emily m. danforth, author of The Miseducation of Cameron Post. I too have many superstitions about talking about works in progress, so I will say nothing more except GOOD LUCK!

somuchflotsam:

For those who have been so lovely to inquire: I am hard at work on another YA novel. Before I was just at work. But now it’s hard at work, I promise. It’s contemp and very celesborific. One of its two narrators is a wunderkind writer named Sylvan. In the image above you can read her expressing concerns that align pretty well with my own in regard to saying very much about WIPs. Though, of course, Sylvan’s take is rather more sharp-tongued than mine.

My reluctance to talk about what I’m working on, even when I’m nearing completion, probably has something to do with several superstitions that I’m too lazy to properly examine. But I do appreciate the interest from folks who have been interested. I hope you’ll stay tuned for awhile longer.

Yay! The above comes from emily m. danforth, author of The Miseducation of Cameron Post. I too have many superstitions about talking about works in progress, so I will say nothing more except GOOD LUCK!